The Privacy BlogPrivacy, Security, Cryptography, and Anonymity

TAG | internet

On September 24, the Russian Duma passed a bill moving the date on which all Internet services must host local data locally from Sept 1, 2016 to Jan 1, 2015. That is an effectively impossible timeline for international Internet companies, which is probably the whole point. While the bill has not been finally passed, the […]

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A Brazilian court is enforcing a constitutional ban on anonymity by requiring Apple and Google to remove Secret, an anonymous social network chatting app from their app stores. Microsoft is being required to remove Cryptic, a similar windows phone app. In addition to that, they have been ordered to remove the app from the phones […]

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Fake Google Digital Certificates Found & Confiscated On July 2, Google engineers discovered unauthorized certificates for Google domains in circulation. They had been issued by the National Informatics Center in India. They are a trusted sub-authority under the Indian Controller of Certifying Authorities (CCA). They in turn are part of the Microsoft Root Store of […]

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Continuing the pattern of Internet restrictions I talked about before, Russia has passed a new law requiring Internet companies to keep the personal data of Russians in data centers within the country. The ostensible reason for this is to protect Russians against US Government snooping (in the wake of the Snowden leaks), and against other […]

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The South China Morning Post reports that the ban on Facebook, Twitter, the New York Times, and many other sites, will be lifted, but only in the Shanghai free-trade zone. The information came from anonymous government sources within China. The purpose is to make the zone more attractive to foreign companies and workers who expect […]

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Wired reports on a move by the Japanese government to ask websites to block users who “abuse” TOR.  I assume that TOR is being used as an example, and it would apply to any secure privacy tool. The interesting question is whether this is simply a foot in the door on the way to banning […]

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Welcome to episode 7 of The Privacy Blog Podcast. In April’s episode, we’ll be looking at the blacklisting of SSL certificate authorities by Mozilla Firefox – Specifically, what this complex issue means and why Mozilla chose to start doing this. In more breaking online privacy news, I will be discussing the security implications of relying […]

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For years I have been telling people to be especially careful when they venture into the dark back alleys of the Internet. My thinking was that these more “wild west” areas would be home to most of the malware and other attacks. Dark Reading analyzes a Cisco report which says that online shopping sites and […]

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Gigaom reports on a major security issue at Nokia, first announced in the “Treasure Hunt” blog. Their Asha and Lumia phones come with something they call the “Xpress Browser”. To improve the browser experience, the web traffic is proxies and cached. That is a fairly common and accepted practice. Where Nokia has stepped into questionable […]

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It looks like Syria is back on the Internet again. I have not seen any indications of unusual atrocities the, so why the short outage?

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