The Privacy BlogPrivacy, Security, Cryptography, and Anonymity

TAG | anonymity

Unknown known

Your Anonymous Posts to Secret Aren’t Anonymous After All | Threat Level | WIRED

This article describes a clever attack against Secret, the “anonymous” secret sharing app.

Their technique allows the attacker to isolate just a single target, so any posts seen are known to be from them. The company is working on detecting and preventing this attack, but it is a hard problem.

In general, any anonymity system needs to blend the activity of a number of users so that any observed activity could have originated from any of them. For effective anonymity the number needs to be large. Just pulling from the friends in my address book who also use Secret is way too small a group.

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

· · · · ·

Sauron-BrazilA Brazilian court is enforcing a constitutional ban on anonymity by requiring Apple and Google to remove Secret, an anonymous social network chatting app from their app stores. Microsoft is being required to remove Cryptic, a similar windows phone app.

In addition to that, they have been ordered to remove the app from the phones of all users who have installed it. These kinds of retroactive orders to have companies intrusively modify the contents of all of their customer’s devices are concerning. At least these apps are free, if users had paid for them, that would introduce another complication.

One wonders how this will apply to tourists or business travelers visiting Brazil. Will their phones be impacted as well?

The law exists to allow victims of libel or slander to identify and confront their those speakers.

While this ruling only applies to Apple, Google, and Microsoft, and only with respect to the Secret and Cryptic apps, the underlying principle extends much further. There are still final rulings to come, so this is not the last word on this situation.

Anonymizer has had a great many Brazilian customers for many years. Anonymizer provides those users important protections which are well established in international human rights law. We certainly hope that they will continue to be allowed to use our services.

Brazil Court Issues Injunction Against Secret And Calls For App To Be Remotely Wiped | TechCrunch

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

· · · ·

TorAppLogo

Tor just announced that they have detected and blocked an attack that may have allowed hidden services and possibly users to be de-anonymized.

It looks like this may be connected to the recently canceled BlackHat talk on Tor vulnerabilities. One hopes so, otherwise the attack may have been more hostile than simple research.

Tor is releasing updated server and client code to patch the vulnerability used in this attack. This shows once again one of the key architectural weaknesses in Tor, the distributed volunteer infrastructure. On the one hand, it means that you are not putting all of your trust in one entity. On the other hand, you really don’t know who you are trusting, and anyone could be running the nodes you are using. Many groups hostile to your interests would have good reason to run Tor nodes and to try to break your anonymity.

The announcement from Tor is linked below.

Tor security advisory: “relay early” traffic confirmation attack | The Tor Blog

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

· ·

Jul/14

29

Russia puts a bounty on Tor's head

TorAppLogo

The Russian Ministry of Internal Affairs recently announced a contest to create a method to identify Tor users, with a prize of about $114,000.

Clearly the government is worried about the ability of Tor to allow people to bypass the increasingly draconian Internet laws that have been put in place. This puts a big target on Tor, but people have been working on breaking Tor for years. This year a talk at Black Hat on cracking Tor anonymity was pulled without explanation after it was announced and scheduled.

Being free and well established, Tor has the largest user base of any privacy service, so it is the obvious first target. Its distributed design also introduces paths for attack not available in other designs like Anonymizer Universal.

It will be interesting to see if this move drives Tor users to other services, and whether that in turn leads to expanded efforts to crack those tools.

Fancy $110,000? Easy! Just be Russian and find a way of cracking Tor | HOTforSecurity

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

· ·

Thanks to WhoIsHostingThis for providing this informative infographic (click to enlarge). They provide a cool service that allows you to look up the hosting service behind any website.

Digital_Fingerprint_WIHT_Anonimyzer (1)

· · ·

Standard-Profile-Picture.jpgThe Importance of Privacy & The Power of Anonymizers: A Talk With Lance Cottrell From Ntrepid — The Social Network Station A recent interview I did, talking about data anonymization and mobile device privacy. Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

·

Bag on Head

One often hears that some massive collection of data will not have privacy implications because it has been “anonymized”. Any time you hear that, treat the statement with great skepticism. It turns out that effectively anonymizing data, making it impossible to identify the individuals in the data set, is much harder than you might think. The reason comes down to combinatorics and structured information.

This article on Medium by Vijay Pandurangan discusses a massive data set of NYC taxies, complete with medallion number, license number, time and location of every pick up and drop off, and more. The key to unraveling it is that there are just not that many taxi medallions, and the numbering structure only allows for a manageable possible number of combinations (under 24 million). While that would be a lot to work through by hand, Vijay was able to hash and identify every single one in the database in under 2 minutes.

Another approach would have been to make a set of known trips, note the location, time, etc., then use that to map the hash to the true identity. More work but very straight forward.

Even harder is the problem of combinatorics when applied to “non-identifying” data. One will often see birth date (or partial birth date) zip code, gender, age, and the like treated as non-identifying. Just five digit Zip-code, date of birth, and gender will uniquely identify people 63% of the time.

A study of cell phone location data showed that just 4 location references was enough to uniquely identify individuals.

This is a great resource on all kinds of de-anonymization.

The reality is that, once enough is collected is is almost certainly identifiable. Aggregation provides the best anonymization, where individual records represent large groups of people rather than individuals.

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

Update: small edit for clarification of my statement about aggregation.

·

IStock 000007822598Small

Canada’s Supreme Court just released a ruling providing some protection for on-line anonymity. Specifically, the ruling requires law enforcement to obtain a warrant before going to an Internet provider to obtain the identity of a user. Previously they were free to simply approach the provider and ask (but not compel) the information.

The judges found that there is a significant expectation of privacy with respect to the identifying information, and that anonymity is a foundation of that right.

Unfortunately the case in question revolves around child pornography, which creates a great deal of passion. Much of the reaction against the decision has come from those working to protect abused children. Because the ruling has implications primarily far from child porn cases, I applaud the court in taking the larger and longer view of the principle at work.

It is important to remember that the court is not saying that the information can not be obtained. This is not an absolute protection of anonymity. This decision simply requires a warrant for the information, ensuring that there is at least probable cause before penetrating the veil of anonymity. 

Other analysis: here, here, here.

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

· ·

AU Icon

Paying for anonymity is a tricky thing, mostly because on-line payments are strikingly non-anonymous. The default payment mechanism on the Internet is the Credit Card, which generally requires hard identification. There are anonymous pre-paid cards, but they are getting harder to find, and most pre-paid cards are requiring registration with real name and (in the US) social security number.

We are working on supporting Bitcoin which provides some anonymity, but not as much as you might think. New tools for Bitcoin anonymity are being developed, so this situation may improve, and other crypto currencies are gaining traction as well.

When it comes to anonymity, cash is still king. Random small US bills are truly anonymous, and widely available (1996 study showed over half of all physical US currency circulates outside the country). While non-anonymous payments only allow Anonymizer to know who its customers are, not what they are doing, that information might be sensitive and important to protect for some people.

That is why Anonymizer accepts cash payments for its services. Obviously it is slower and more cumbersome, but for those who need it, we feel it is important to provide the ultimate anonymous payment option. If you are looking at a privacy provider, even if you don’t plan to pay with cash, take a look at whether it is an option. It could tell you something about how seriously they take protecting your privacy overall.

· · ·

Whisper

Whistleblowers Beware: Apps Like Whisper and Secret Will Rat You Out | Business | WIRED

Here is more evidence that, if a service has access to your information, that it can get out. In this case the privacy services Whisper and Secret have privacy policies that say they will release messages tied to your identity if presented with a court order, but also to enforce their terms of service and even in response to a simple claim of “wrongdoing” (whatever that might mean).

Anonymizer has no logs connecting user activity to user identity, thus we don’t have these problems.

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+
.

<< Latest posts

Older posts >>