The Privacy BlogPrivacy, Security, Cryptography, and Anonymity

CAT | vulnerability

D Link Logo Blue strap edited

If you care at all about security and privacy, a recent security analysis of the D-Link DWR-932 B LTE router will make your head explode.

Researcher Pierre Kim found an amazing set of security vulnerabilities that should embarrass a first year developer. (more…)

· · · ·

HiRes

There is a new “man in the middle” attack against web pages that is significantly worse than I have seen before. Interestingly, it does not even appear to be intended as an attack. (more…)

·

3 birds on a wire

Google engineer Adrienne Felt recently noticed that Gogo in-flight Wi-Fi was messing with the SSL certificates on secure Google web pages.

Her browser showed a problem with the HTTPs connection, and further investigation showed that the SSL certificate was self signed by Gogo’s own untrusted certificate authority. (more…)

· · · · ·

Internet Explorer 10 start screen tile svg

Governments urge Internet Explorer users to switch browsers until fix found | ZDNet

This and many other articles are relaying the information that governments are encouraging users to move to Chrome, Firefox, or Safari until this Microsoft Internet explorer bug is fixed. The vulnerability seems to have been in every version of IE since 6 through the current version 11. It is a remote exploitation vulnerability, so attackers can use it to run arbitrary code on your computer, effectively “owning” it. There are some work arounds within IE that may prevent the attack, but for now it is much safer and easier to simply move to a different browser.

It is important to remember that using a VPN like Anonymizer Universal does NOT provide any protection against this kind of attack. This is an attack directly against the browser using the content you have “requested”. The attack is launched from the site you are visiting, so the hostile content would flow through the VPN unhindered. 

Anonymizer strongly encourages its users to move to Firefox, Safari, or Chrome, at least until this problem is resolved.

Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

· · · · ·

20140225-125112.jpg

Apple released an update for Mac OS X 10.9 fixing the serious GOTO FAIL SSL vulnerability. This update appears to resolve the problem for The Safari browser, and many other Apple applications that use SSL/TLS.

If you use a Mac, make sure you install this update ASAP. Go to Software Update and you should see the update available.

Feb/14

23

Apple SSL vulnerability

Cracked EncryptionEverybody has been talking about the Apple SSL vulnerability, but just in case you have missed it….

It turns out that for several years Safari has failed to properly check the cryptographic signatures on Server Key Exchanges allowing attackers to mount man in the middle attacks against your browser sessions. Anyone with the ability to intercept your traffic could read and modify the data to or from any secure website you visit (of course they can always do it with insecure websites). This would include any WiFi you are using, the local ISP, backbone ISPs, and government entities wherever you might be, or anywhere along the path yo the server you are trying to reach.

This vulnerability impacts both iOS as well as Mac OS X. You can test whether you are vulnerable here.

There is a patch already available for iOS so update your device now!

If you are on a Mac, switch to using some browser other than Safari. Chrome and Firefox are both safe from this particular attack.

If you are on Windows, Linux, BSD, or Android, you would appear to be safe.

· ·