The Privacy BlogPrivacy, Security, Cryptography, and Anonymity

CAT | China

“HONG KONG — The Chinese government has adopted new regulations requiring companies that sell computer equipment to Chinese banks to turn over secret source code, submit to invasive audits and build so-called back doors into hardware and software, according to a copy of the rules obtained by foreign technology companies that do billions of dollars’ […]

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Multiple sources are reporting that Google services are once again available in China. They had been blocked in the lead up to the 25th anniversary of Tiananmen Square protests. Access to Google services within China returns | Reuters Lance Cottrell is the Founder and Chief Scientist of Anonymizer. Follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

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In anticipation of possible protests in memory of the Tiananmen Square massacre 25 years ago, China has blocked access to Google search and Gmail. The censorship has been in place for a few days now, suggesting that this may be more than a short term action. China has long blocked access to YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and […]

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The South China Morning Post reports that the ban on Facebook, Twitter, the New York Times, and many other sites, will be lifted, but only in the Shanghai free-trade zone. The information came from anonymous government sources within China. The purpose is to make the zone more attractive to foreign companies and workers who expect […]

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Welcome to The Privacy Blog Podcast for May 2013. In this month’s episode, I’ll discuss how shared hosting is increasingly becoming a target and platform for mass phishing attacks. Also, I’ll speak about the growing threat of Chinese hackers and some of the reasons behind the increase in online criminal activity. Towards the end of […]

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Thanks to the Financial Times for their article on this. When we hear that a company has been hacked by China what is usually meant is that the company has been hacked from a computer with a Chinese IP address. The immediate implication is that it is Chinese government sponsored. Of course, there are many […]

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Another from the “if the data exists, it will get compromised” file. This article from the Washington Post talks about an interesting case of counter surveillance hacking. In 2010, Google disclosed that Chinese hackers breached Google’s servers. What only recently came to light was that one of the things compromised was a database containing information about […]

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The BBC has an article that powerfully reinforces what I have been saying for years about spear phishing. It is worth a read if just for the specific examples. The short version is, if an attacker is going for you specifically, they can do enough research to craft an email and attachment that you are […]

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It appears that China recently launched a poorly executed Man in the Middle (MITM) attack on GitHub. Greatfire.org has all the details. In short: GitHub.com is an https only website, so the only way to monitor it is to use a MITM attack to decrypt the contents of the communications. There is evidence that GitHub […]

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In the tradition of Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal” is “The Dictator’s Practical Guide to Internet Power Retention, Global Edition”. Under the pretext of being a guide on how to crack down on Internet dissent for dictators, it does a nice job of analyzing how the Internet is used by dissidents, and the techniques used […]

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